Created on 15 February 2016 Hits: 1131 Written by WHAT'S UP CARIBBEAN Category: SCIENCE
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COULD BE AN ISSUE HERE, AS WELL

Port-of-Spain -- The drought conditions being experienced in Trinidad and Tobago will continue until June when the rainy season is expected to start, and the Acting Climatologist at the Met Office, Kenneth Kerr, has warned the country to prepare for an abnormally harsh dry season.

 

Kerr and climatologist Dr Cedric Van Meerbeeck of the Barbados- based Caribbean Institute for Meteorology and Hydrology (CIMH), spoke in interviews on the sidelines of an In-Country Workshop: Mapping Provider Capacity and User Needs for Climate Services, held at the Trinidad and Tobago Civil Aviation Authority Conference Room at Caroni North Bank Road, Piarco on Friday.

Kerr said, "So because the season is going to be hot and drier than normal, we are trying to build the awareness to enlighten persons and key stakeholders to be prepared because you know the El Nino is a major impact for climate in Trinidad and Tobago.

"The last time there was an El Nino in 2010, during the dry season of 2010, there was a record number of bush fires. And it's from that perspective that we are trying to build the awareness that if this dry season turns out to be the same as 2010, then you could have a case where bush fires could become very, very significant."

Kerr said drought has always been an issue for Trinidad and Tobago and the region, because some islands, such as Barbados, are water scarce. He said there is always going to be a water challenge and drought also affects agriculture so the local agricultural sector could also be affected as well as some of the other islands which are heavilly dependent on agriculture.

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